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Its a packed issue for you all! Here are the stories in today’s SUPREME. Grab your copy of The Philippine STAR now!

Its a packed issue for you all! Here are the stories in today’s SUPREME. Grab your copy of The Philippine STAR now!

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Ryzza Mae “Cha Cha” Dizon: Top of the class
Before you joined pageants, you were being teased because of your looks. If you were to face those who taunted you before, what would you say to them?
Wala naman po, mag papasalamat lang po ako kasi dahil sa kanila mas lumakas po ang loob ko at kaibigan ko naman po sila, ganun naman po talaga mga bata, diba laging may tuksuhan?
When you won the Little Miss Philippines title, what was your beauty queen moment?
Nung tinawag po ako ni Bossing, hindi po ako makapaniwala na ako yung nanalo, natulala po ako ng ilang segundo, halos akala ko po panaginip lang po lahat ng mga nangyayari, masaya po ako kasi matutulungan ko na po yung mga magulang ko kasi yung tatay ko po walang trabaho, yung mama ko po umaasa lang dati sa maliit na tindahan.
With your sitcom and Eat Bulaga every day, don’t you get exhausted? What is your favorite thing about working on Eat Bulaga?
Hindi naman po ako napapagod, gusto ko po talaga kasi mag artista, sa Eat Bulaga po gusto ko din po kasi ang tagal-tagal na po ng Eat Bulaga, syempre po ngayon kasali na ako. Hindi ako makapaniwala! Sabi nga po ni Mommy dati pinapanuod niya lang po yun eh ngayon po kasali na daw po ako. Masaya po ako kasama lahat ng dabarkads, ang babait po at love ako nila lahat, parang lahat po sila nanay, tatay, tito at tita ko.
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Words by SHINJI MANLANGITPhoto by NIKO VILLEGASProduced by DAVID MILAN

Ryzza Mae “Cha Cha” Dizon: Top of the class

Before you joined pageants, you were being teased because of your looks. If you were to face those who taunted you before, what would you say to them?

Wala naman po, mag papasalamat lang po ako kasi dahil sa kanila mas lumakas po ang loob ko at kaibigan ko naman po sila, ganun naman po talaga mga bata, diba laging may tuksuhan?

When you won the Little Miss Philippines title, what was your beauty queen moment?

Nung tinawag po ako ni Bossing, hindi po ako makapaniwala na ako yung nanalo, natulala po ako ng ilang segundo, halos akala ko po panaginip lang po lahat ng mga nangyayari, masaya po ako kasi matutulungan ko na po yung mga magulang ko kasi yung tatay ko po walang trabaho, yung mama ko po umaasa lang dati sa maliit na tindahan.

With your sitcom and Eat Bulaga every day, don’t you get exhausted? What is your favorite thing about working on Eat Bulaga?

Hindi naman po ako napapagod, gusto ko po talaga kasi mag artista, sa Eat Bulaga po gusto ko din po kasi ang tagal-tagal na po ng Eat Bulaga, syempre po ngayon kasali na ako. Hindi ako makapaniwala! Sabi nga po ni Mommy dati pinapanuod niya lang po yun eh ngayon po kasali na daw po ako. Masaya po ako kasama lahat ng dabarkads, ang babait po at love ako nila lahat, parang lahat po sila nanay, tatay, tito at tita ko.

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Words by SHINJI MANLANGIT
Photo by NIKO VILLEGAS
Produced by DAVID MILAN

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The new Charice

In her first photoshoot since coming out of the closet, Charice talks to Supreme about love, equality, and her future.

One of the things you said in your recent interview with Boy Abunda was to ‘always be true to yourself’. What has that meant for you?

I don’t regret how I used to dress and fix my hair. I always think that the past was a challenge I needed to go through. And I’m not pushing anyone to come out of the closet. I didn’t do what I did in order to say, “Hey, follow me.” I hope what I did serves as an inspiration, but I understand if they don’t want to follow in my footsteps. I understand. It’s part of the situation. You don’t want to hide forever, but you will feel when it’s the right time.

Were there any people in your life who inspired you, in turn, to come out?

Lots, but what really pushed me was me thinking to myself, “Okay, gagawin ko na.” See, before I came out on TV, I’d go to the mall looking like I do. Alyssa and I would go out. What pushed me was I saw that people didn’t react. It was normal to them. When they’d see me, they’d see me as Charice. Of course, I heard other things, you can’t avoid that. But most of the people just went, “Si Charice, o.” Wala nang karugtong.

What’s most important to me is the reaction of Filipinos. Ever since I started showbiz here in the Philippines, there were a lot of naysayers. Sadly, most of them were Filipinos. What I did here, parang buwis-buhay naman talaga kasi either Filipinos love you or they don’t accept you. So it’s a big achievement for me that now, Filipinos are telling me, “we respect you.”

What do you hope for in the future for yourself and other people?

I hope someday, sexual preference will no longer be a big deal. Like, when you see people, you won’t need to ask them. You won’t need a confirmation, you know? Whatever you see is what it is, and people are equal, basically. That’s what I want for everyone. I know this will happen. The time will come.

Are you working on anything new?

I still have one month here in the Philippines and I’m thinking of working on a third album because I’ve only released two albums in the Philippines, and it’s been a while. So gusto ko mag-release ng isa pang album dito para naman bago ako umalis, may maiwan man lang ako sa fans ko dito. I’m very excited kasi kakausap na ako ng mga ilang producers and everything.

Yung idea is gusto kong ilagay yung lahat ng mga favorite songs ko na gusto kong i-share at gawan ng sarili kong version. And then, I’ll go back to LA. We’re recording something, so it’s going to be a busy year.

How do you want to be remembered?

I just want to be remembered as Charice, the singer. Nasabi ko na yung dapat kong sabihin about me and other things, so let’s just move on and focus on  what I share with people, which is my music and my voice. So, sana, yun nalang.

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Words by CARINA SANTOS
Photo by CHOLO DELA VEGA
Produced by DAVID MILAN
Makeup by JANINA DIZON
Grooming by DONALD LAPEZ

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Meet Tini Dahl: Supreme’s next face to watch out for

It’s the awkward girls in high school who take the real stages later on in life.

Half-Filipino and half-Norwegian model Tini Dahl describes herself as a dangly kid in her mid-teens, with limbs too long for her body; a tomboy who couldn’t fix her hair to save her life. She also had the stereotypical dorky health issues, like asthma and allergies. It was her older sister, Lala, who seemed to be born wearing stilettos. Lala eventually eased Tini into the world of all things feminine.

Tini’s life has been as exotic as her looks. Studying in an international school in Sweden and meeting students from all around the world made her realize that she wanted to travel constantly. Since then, she hasn’t spent more than nine months in one country. She studied in England, took a year off to backpack around Southeast Asia, worked as a waiter in Oslo, and moved to Spain on a whim at the age of 19, where she met her boyfriend. An International Relations and Development Studies major, Tini came to the Philippines through a grant that enabled her to do her thesis abroad. “I fell in love with the place and couldn’t book a ticket fast enough to come back,” she says. She returned four months ago to work as an IT analyst for a Norwegian oil company.

Despite her strong features, modeling was completely unplanned. Tini merely took a little fashion risk and showed up at a club in what she describes as “really eye-catching striped pants” and caught the attention of Look’s Carmencita Sioson, who asked her to do a small style feature depicting a girl in her 20s. Her unforeseen career has snowballed since then. A week later, she was booked for a Preview editorial. She also did the AVP for Jerome Ang’s Fashion Week 2013 showcase.

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Words by CATE DE LEON
Photos by BJ PASCUAL 
Styled by MIGUEL URBINA TAN

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Q&A with Elmo Magalona

How do you think your dad would’ve felt if he were here right now?

Before, I used to say, “I hope Dad’s happy with what I’m doing now,” or “I hope he’s proud of what we’re doing now.” But now, I’m really 100-percent sure that my siblings and I are making him really happy wherever he may be right now. Also, thanks to technology, Oishi, and the people that help us out; nakikita at nae-express namin ‘yun ngayon.

How do you think the Magalona family makes your dad’s memory proud?

Hindi kami mapaghihiwalay sa isa’t isa, eh. Everyone is important. All of us have key roles — kumbaga meron akong strict ate, cool ate, at kuya na second idol ko, next to my dad, and I have younger siblings who keep me entertained at times. And of course, our mom who’s been there since day one. Sometimes, di ako makasama sa friends ko. Pero sumasama ako sa pamilya ko at complete kami, okay na ako ron.

How do you see this growing in the future?

Everything is getting better, especially with our family. Because of these things, we connect more with each other. It makes us stronger as a family. We really try our best to continue the legacy and honor both our parents.

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Words by DLS PINEDA

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Lust, daze, Manila

The word “party” is so interesting to me. People go to clubs expecting a party. But the difference between going to a party and going to a club only becomes apparent when you arrive at one expecting the other. 

As a portrait photographer, I don’t photograph parties, but do I photograph people at parties sometimes. Those times only happen when a certain type of party comes along — the type I hear about through friends of friends; the type which happens off the dress-coded, guestlisted party grid I usually avoid.

Welcome to Last Days Manila.

Text and photos by JOSEPH PASCUAL

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A tribute to cinema legend Eddie Romero (1924-2013)

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By FRANCIS JOSEPH H. CRUZ

He was the oldest in the crowd. Seated among an ambitious batch of wide-eyed graduates of a Mowelfund course was Eddie Romero, the venerated veteran filmmaker of such works as Aguila and Ganito Kami Noon, Paano Kayo Ngayon?  He was there as a guest of honor, a beacon of what is to come for the filmmakers who are about to test the skills they have mustered from several months of sitting through lectures and practical demonstrations. When he was acknowledged by the master of ceremony, he stood up with a certain air of dignity one expects from someone who has lived a full and productive life. Predictably, his mere presence drew a round of applause from the crowd.

Eddie Romero would still continue to grace film events, garnering the same acknowledgment from his peers and the public by virtue of the title that was bestowed on him by the Philippine government. In a film industry where dreamers are turned into auteurs by virtue of a novel story treatment, a powerful pitch, and a sizable film grant, Romero’s presence felt reassuring. He represented not only an era where Filipino films were golden and weren’t begging for viewership, but an artistry that was a product of time and hard work, with a little sprinkling of good old luck. One can only wish that the filmmakers who gave their automatic applause upon the mere mention of his name acknowledged not only the grandeur of several of his works but also his admirable story.

It was his early literary work and somebody else’s love story that pushed a young Eddie Romero into the world of film. Legendary Gerardo de Leon, enamoured and impressed by a short story he read and a native beauty, visited Silliman University. There, he wooed his future wife, and convinced Romero, the son of a schoolteacher and a government official who was already making waves writing stories for various publications, to write for him. De Leon regarded Romero as his protégé. He was the literary voice that completed De Leon’s visual verve. After a few collaborations, Romero would be ready to direct his first film. However, the Pacific War happened, and his directorial debut had to be shelved.

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7 questions for Paolo Roldan

What are some of the things you learned from Givenchy creative director Ricardo Tisci?

PAOLO ROLDAN: Be humble. Be yourself. Be nice to everybody. I had more than just a working relationship with Ricardo, he actually became a friend of mine. And those were the things that we would tell me, to most importantly be myself and not care what everybody else thinks. Just don’t lose yourself.

What’s the model stereotype or myth that you proved wrong in your years of work?

(Laughs) There’s a lot. Have you ever seen Zoolander? That’s pretty much what we had to deal with every day. But I guess there are times when that kind of thing happens. It’s natural. It’s not like people are going around and acting like that. You do have mental lapses sometimes just from being tired of traveling. I’d (also) like to think I’m smarter than what they say models are. (Laughs) I guess that’s it.

You’ve done a lot of print campaigns, but are you still freaked out or weirded out when you see yourself blown up on a big billboard like the one in Guadalupe?

Well, that one in particular, yes. I’ve had one pretty big before and I’ve heard some things about stuff in Dubai for the Givenchy campaign, but I’ve never actually seen them. So when I saw this one in Guadalupe, I was like “Whoa, that’s just massive.” They look like big buildings with this dude. It’s kind of dope, though. I kind of like it.

What are some of the most played songs on your iPhone?

A lot of Bob Marley, man. I’m a very Zen guy so I play a lot of Bob Marley. Reggae and old school hip-hop.

You showed some pretty rad dance moves in Justin Wu’s Boys of Fashion Week videos. Is music or dancing something you could fall back on if you’re not modeling?

Not necessarily fall back on, because I’m not a pro dancer, but I do love dancing. That’s just the Filipino in me. I’m pretty sure you could get down as well, most Filipinos can.

Aside from dancing, what’s the most Pinoy thing about you?

My love for food. I love isaw. (Laughs) That’s so crazy, but I do love it, even my two friends, who are from the UK. They’ve been willing to try everything. I love rice. As much as I love rice though I gotta stay away from it, but since I got here I have been chowing on rice pretty often.

Aside from your work, what are the other ways you express yourself creatively?

I like to sketch. I do that quite often actually. When I’m bored, I just sketch. I have a sketchbook. And with my friends Sebastian and Tom, we just randomly come up with, like for example, this Philippine thing we’re documenting. We’re gonna put out a video for it sometime soon. And Sebastian and I had just finished working on a hair salon campaign in Toronto, which should come out in a couple of months. We’re just finishing editing it.

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Words by DON JAUCIAN
Photo by BJ PASCUAL
Produced by DAVID MILAN
Grooming by JANINA DIZON for L’Oreal Professionnel
Special thanks to BENCH BODY

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Pinoy art shines at Art Basel HK

By JAM ACUZAR

The superpowers of the art world flew from New York, London, Beijing, and many other cities to attend the first edition of Art Basel Hong Kong last week, which opened on May 23 and ended May 26, at the HK Convention and Exhibition Centre.

Art fairs are a market place for art. It is a meeting place for galleries, collectors, art dealers, and curators to buy and sell art. Besides monetary exchange, however, art fairs provide a venue for social and intellectual exchange as well. Forums and talks were available for people to sit and listen to the most renowned members of the art world discuss and debate on art criticism, building new museums, and others. The Philippines’ very own Marcel Crespo, for example, gave a talk together with other major collectors entitled “Collector’s Focus, The Asia-Pacific Region.”

Besides being part of the Basel “brand,” the event marks Asia as being a top player in the global art circuit. Some 67,000 visitors attended the fair, with major VIPs flying in, including big names such as Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich and partner Dasha Zhukova, Wendi Murdoch, American art dealer and curator Jeffrey Deitch, and even Kate Moss, proving the Asian art market to be just as important as that of the Western world’s.

Two hundred sixty-six galleries participated, including four of the Philippines’ top galleries. There were also international galleries showing works by Philippine artists like Geraldine Javier at Arario Gallery (Seoul) and Manuel Ocampo at Nathalie Obadia Gallery (Paris and Brussels).

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8 questions for Ian Somerhalder and Nina Dobrev

Ian, what memories did you take from your last trip to the Philippines?

IAN SOMERHALDER: I was in Palawan which is truly one the most beautiful places in the world. I was just greeted by so much environmental beauty, the people were so great to me. The wildlife, the environment, the people, the food, are just incredible. So I took away a lot from my trip to the Philippines. Like, a lot, a lot, a lot. I really wanna go back and spend more time there.

Nina, what did Ian tell you about his trip to the Philippines?

NINA DOBREV: The people were awful. I’m kidding! I saw the pictures he didn’t really need to say much. But he did say a lot. When I saw the pictures, they spoke more than any words could describe. It was so beautiful, I was so jealous I couldn’t be there. It’s such a beautiful place.

Would you guys come back together next time?

NINA: Hopefully, I really want to go and see the Philippines.

IAN: Yeah, I’d love for her to see it.

What made you say yes to do the campaign?

IAN: They’re just incredible people. They’re so giving and generous to their employees and customers.

NINA: He told me about the experience and it was great. It’s just a great brand with great clothes. I’m just excited they asked me to be part of Penshoppe.

What’s your day-to-day sartorial style?

NINA: I’m casual chic.

IAN: I’m a dude. Just jeans and T-shirt. Something comfortable.

How are you guys like in your days off?

IAN: Sleeping. There’s a big amount of energy that goes into the work.

NINA: Our daily lives are very intense. Work is intense, travel is intense. So when it’s not work, we rest.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

IAN: Sleeping a lot more.

NINA: Kind of all over. Hopefully doing a lot of great things.

IAN: Doing great films, the foundation will be bigger.

NINA: Hopefully traveling more. We work 10 months a year and when we travel, we don’t get to stay long. So hopefully, yeah, traveling more.

Any Tagalog words that you have learned?

NINA: What’s crazy in Tagalog?

IAN: Nakakaloka! I love nakakaloka!

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Words by TIM YAP
Photos courtesy of PENSHOPPE

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7 reasons why it matters to come out of the closet

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BY GABBIE TATAD

1. It shows that people still value honesty over prejudice. No one likes feeling lied to or being excluded from a thinly veiled secret. There are a lot of ignorant people out there, sure, but there are many who just want to know the truth. In the words of Anderson Cooper, “It’s become clear to me that by remaining silent on certain aspects of my personal life for so long, I have given some the mistaken impression that I am trying to hide something — something that makes me uncomfortable, ashamed or even afraid. This is distressing because it is simply not true… In a perfect world, I don’t think it’s anyone else’s business, but I do think there is value in standing up and being counted.”

2. It opens up a dialogue. It allows us to give our opinions a workout, to hear from those who are uncomfortable with homosexuality, to share what we know to be true, and even to find a place where, while we may not all agree, we may dispel all room for hate and violence.

3. It loosens up the idea of what’s “gay.” We’ve been fed massive amounts of stereotypes, so much so that even some of my gay friends who don’t like fashion/make-up/working out/bright colors feel as though they’re not “gay enough.” In the same manner that not all girls like to get their hair done or wear frothy dresses, having a certain sexual preference doesn’t mean you morph into Carson Kressley overnight.

Yes, there are the expected fashion designers, theater actors, and hairdressers. But there are also basketball fans and soldiers, conservatives and liberals, brothers and friends. The spectrum is wide, and there is no one-size-fits-all type of personality suited to the same sexual preference.

4. It allows us to see people, not preference. I have a gay friend — let’s call him Andrew — who works in the film industry. He recently had a project filming a group of kids, one of whom he treated like his own little brother. During some down time at the shoot, someone on the staff jokingly called Andrew a “faggot.” Andrew dealt with it gracefully enough, but the little boy he was close to overheard the exchange. He asked if Andrew was one of “the happy people.” Andrew said yes, and asked if the little boy would prefer that he stay away. The little boy simply said, “You’re my friend,” and hugged Andrew.

Anderson Cooper, for example, has been speaking to us through our TV sets for years, telling us how bad things were around the world and inspiring ways we could help make it better. To many, he’s someone they can count on to give it to them straight. So although not everyone agrees when it comes to homosexuality, it helps break down the concept when you know, love, and respect someone who happens to be gay. The “gay” part then, quite suddenly, seems secondary.

5. It lowers the margin for shame. Not everyone has to be out before they’re ready. But I feel like a lot of incidents that occur in the darkness — the bad ones, the ones that we hate talking about, the kind that other good gay people have had to answer for and bear such indignation for — happen because there is so much fear. Fear of being judged by loved ones, of one’s own predilections, of being less of a man or woman, of being vulnerable to the ignorance of so many.

This in no way excuses sick behavior (I’m looking at you, Jerry Sandusky), but there are so many things that can be avoided with a proper support system, and it starts with seeing decent people who’ve come out and have managed to build a good life for themselves. Inspiration has a power that isn’t to be underestimated.

6. It sheds more light on the serious problem of bullying. Last February, Rolling Stone published an article on the issue of teen suicides in Anoka, Minnesota. There was one instance mentioned where a 13-year-old lesbian girl committed suicide, and bullies at school were telling her best friend (who is also gay) that she should consider blowing her brains out, too.

People will tell you that kids are kids, and they can’t possibly be sure about who they are at such a young age. When I was 13, I knew I would spend my life writing regardless of whether I did it professionally. I knew I liked boys and music. I knew I hated math. I understood who I was then as much as I do now.

There is a reason why adults are taking a stand, starting things like The Trevor Project. Cruelty can have serious repercussions, and the first step to breaking the culture of discrimination is being able to talk about it.

7. It gives hope to those who need it. It used to be a question of “whites” and “coloreds,” which has since evolved into cultural backgrounds being stereotyped as terrorists, drug mules, what have you. I don’t think we will ever live in a world that is absent of its prejudices; it’s part of what makes us all very human and imperfect.

But to know that it does get better, to have an ally — even if it’s just a face on the nightly news, to know that it is possible to lead a life where your sexual orientation is not your first identifier, is a consolation that many are looking for. It’s not always a matter of pride or rights, but of acceptance; that regardless of how different you are, you are worthy of respect, decency, kindness, and love.

Originally: “7 Lessons from Anderson Cooper (Supreme, July 7, 2012)”

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Q&A with Ramon Bautista: He’s pogi and he knows it

What is pogi for you?

Pogi is not just a physical appearance. It’s a way of life. A pogi carries confidence, attitude, and best of all, a desire to make the world a better place.

What’s the secret to getting the girl?

Just be the best you can be. If you have to be a different guy, go for it. That’s putting your best foot forward when your other foot has alipunga.

What’s a pogi way to get out of the friendzone?

The only way to get out of the friendzone is to initiate the “Cobra” move. Bigla mong i-kiss yung nang friendzone sayo. Pag kinilig edi panalo, pag hindi, it’s friendship over. Either way, you escape the friendzone.

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Words by CATE DE LEON
Photos by MAU MAURICIO
Produced by DAVID MILAN
Grooming by AU MAURICIO

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Rico Blanco’s altered state

“I knew Fiesto Bandido was going to be fun. But I didn’t know it was going to be that fun,” he shares. “It’s still me. And I think it’s everyone. But the hat, the armor, the bahag, the wristbands, and the tassels — they bring it out. It releases a part of you that you keep suppressed.”

“Galactik Fiestamatik” is, perhaps, one of those things that Rico had suppressed for a long time. Unlike “Your Universe” and all his previous works with Rivermaya, this one’s purely a product of his own effort and wit — no collaborations, not even second opinions. While the first album recruited the likes of genius bassists like Buddy Zabala, Nathan Azarcon, and Louie Talan, along with drummers like Wendell Garcia and Junjun Regalado, “Fiestamatik” was pure Rico Blanco.

“In whatever album, there’s a project. I set my limits. So for this one, I wanted to set a certain range which I won’t go over. And I tried to make it work by using a small range, unlike, say, Liwanag sa Dilim  where I start low and go the whole range as the song progresses,” Rico says. “I challenge myself to make a song work without resorting to old habits. Early on, I challenged myself to do things differently. It excited me.”

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Words by DLS PINEDA
Photos by GABBY CANTERO
Produced by PEPE DIOKNO

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How ‘Maynila’ was restored

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The fully-restored version of Lino Brocka’s “Maynila Sa Mga Kuko Ng Liwanag” was the fourth Filipino film shown at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. We talked to Bono Olgado of the National Film Archives about the circumstances that led to it.

Take us a bit through the restoration. How did it start and how long did it take?

After Genghis Khan, we heard from the grapevine that Scorsese’s World Cinema Foundation (WCF) was exploring the possibility of restoring another Southeast Asian film after the Indonesian film After the Curfew (1954) by Usmar Ismail in 2012, and that they had talked to the Asian Film Archive in Singapore, which had a print of Maynila courtesy of Mike De Leon. We got in touch with Douglas Laible of WCF through colleagues, and we started corresponding on the possibility of restoring a film together. We threw around a number of different titles to work on, but Doug had been talking with the Asian Film Archive (AFA) and also with Mike de Leon as early as the summer of 2012 regarding Maynila. Considering the significance of Lino Brocka’s oeuvre and the paucity of relatively good prints in circulation, we decided that his films would make excellent candidates for restoration. By then, it was between Maynila and Jaguar. But given the availability of workable elements of Maynila initially through AFA and Mike, we ultimately decided to push through with it. The restoration was done at the L’Immagine Ritrovata in Bologna, Italy, which the WCF regularly uses and where Genghis was restored. The actual restoration began in November. Mike de Leon personally oversaw color grading and subtitling.

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